Tag Archives: secularism

Does Islam Need A Reformation? Debate

Theo Hobson identifies that though there is a stronger secular liberalism, which he acknowledges as more aggressive, he does spell out the existence of a softer, more inclusive one too. He asks the Muslim panel if they recognise and acknowledge the latter, softer type. I sense it is this question that is perceived as being (apparently) ‘skirted’: an accusation from the non Muslim party. The way the Muslim panel respond is as though this softer type of secular liberalism either doesn’t exist or doesn’t matter even if it existed. Presumably, this is because of soft liberalism’s perceived irrelevance given the current context of tighter measures around freedom and self autonomy ostensibly against terrorists but actually against mainstream practicing British Muslims. I sense the non Muslim cannot fathom the motivation for the Muslim panel’s defensiveness. They are accused of ‘playing the victim’. They respond: they’re merely representing reality.

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‘Religion Causes More War’ Do You Believe?

Religion Causes More War...


Goodbye ‘Religion Causes War’ Argument.

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‘Islamo-Fascist’ States Only Exist in a Modern (Muslim and Non Muslim) State of Mind

khilafah-1432408

Was the Prophet’s Madinan ‘State’ (the first Islamic ‘State’), which is frequently hailed as the model, the ‘ideal state’ for devout practitioners of Islam (practicing Muslims), an Islamo-Fascist State?

No.

Please click here to see why the first Islamic State was not even a ‘State’ as we understand it.

So in terms of all those modern Muslim nation-states we have nowadays, where does the appellation ‘Fascist’ come from?

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The First Islamic State was NOT a ‘State’

Did a ‘State’ as we understand ‘State’ even exist in the first Islamic ‘State’?

No.

End of post.

___

WHAT?

O.K., let’s begin again.

Dr Khalid Blankinship wrote an article called ‘The History of the Caliphate‘. In this, he was actually responding to a question about whether the khilâfah (Caliphate) had a continuous existence till the office was terminated by the newly founded, modern, secular state of Turkey (1342 AH/1924 CE).
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Can you spot the difference between Propaganda and Public Information? [Media 1 of 6]

 

How can we tell the difference between Public Information and Propaganda? With the increased use of social media, how are politicians using Facebook and Twitter to influence you in this techno-savvy age? The importance of the answer is all to do with our awareness (or lack thereof) of the manipulations by the state, for instance, to ‘get into’ (that is to say, ‘to influence’, ‘to control’) our minds. Does this not bother you?

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What’s the Social-ution?

Isolated 1

PART 1

Society is remote.

Where the robots live

Estranged

In cell to cell,

Padded walls,

Talking sideways through the wire or the wave,

Satellite inn, alone.

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Hobbes’ Folly: The Creation of Secularism and a new Intolerance

A must read…

Abdullah al Andalusi

Article published on MDI (6th January 2014)

thomas_hobbesThomas Hobbes (1588 – 1679 AD) is renowned in Western history as being the father of modern Western Political Philosophy. His seminal book ‘Leviathan’ established the foundational ideas and concepts for what would later be called Secularism and Liberalism. Hobbes argues that the purpose of government is exclusively material, namely, the prevention of in-fighting and disorder between people. Government was required because, according to Hobbes, ‘the time that men live without a common power to keep them all in awe, they are in that condition which is called war, and such a war as is of every man against every man’ (‘Leviathan’).

In Hobbes’ time, Christianity was heavily dominant in politics, with wars between kingdoms fought over different interpretations of Christianity – mainly on the question of whether or not the Catholic Church and Pope should have spiritual authority over Christians, and Christian…

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