Thinking Morbidly or Thinking Morgudly?

Morbid

Characterized by or appealing to an abnormal and unhealthy interest in disturbing and unpleasant subjects, esp. death and disease.

Adjective

Synonyms: unhealthy – diseased – unsound – ill – sickly

Etymology (origin): 1650s, “of the nature of a disease, indicative of a disease,” from Latin morbidus “diseased,” from morbus “sickness, disease, ailment, illness,” from root of mori “to die,” which is possibly from PIE root *mer- “to rub, pound, wear away” (cf. Sanskrit mrnati “crushes, bruises;” Greek marainein “to consume, exhaust, put out, quench,” marasmus “consumption”).

Pun: More bad

Therefore…

Morgud

(Pronounced ‘mor-good’)

Characterized by or appealing to a natural and healthy interest in soothing and pleasant subjects, esp. the remembrance of death and its positive significance to living more appreciatively, fully, responsibly, maturely, purposefully, dynamically. With greater God-Consciousness, piety, humbleness of spirit and purposeful-living.

Adjective

Synonyms: healthy – perfect – sound – alive – attentive

Etymology (origin): 2019, “of the remembrance of death, of the remembrance of goodness, of the remembrance of God, indicative of a death, goodness and God,” from Latin mori “to die,” which is possibly from PIE root *mer- “to rub, pound, wear away” (cf. Sanskrit mrnati “crushes, bruises;” Greek marainein “to consume, exhaust, put out, quench,” marasmus “consumption”). That is to say to reflect on the finiteness of the finite in contradistinction and as a way to positively appreciate the infinity of the infinite (God) and the significane therefore of good action (as requested by God) in our finite lives.

Good: Old English gōd “that which is good, goodness; advantage, benefit; gift; virtue; property;” from good (adj.). Old English god (with a long “o”) “virtuous; desirable; valid; considerable,” probably originally “having the right or desirable quality,” from Proto-Germanic *gothaz (cf. Old Norse goðr, Dutch goed, Old High German guot, German gut, Gothic goþs), originally “fit, adequate, belonging together,” from PIE root *ghedh- “to unite, be associated, suitable” (cf. Old Church Slavonic godu “pleasing time,” Russian godnyi “fit, suitable,” Old English gædrian “to gather, to take up together”). As an expression of satisfaction, from early 15c.

God: Old English god “supreme being, deity; the Christian God; image of a god; godlike person,” from Proto-Germanic *guthan (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch god, Old High German got, German Gott, Old Norse guð, Gothic guþ), from PIE *ghut- “that which is invoked” (cf. Old Church Slavonic zovo “to call,” Sanskrit huta- “invoked,” an epithet of Indra), from root *gheu(e)- “to call, invoke.”

Pun: more good

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